Teaching

Economic History

The World Economy: History and Theory

Dr. Eric Golson (module leader), Dr. Alex Karalis-Isaac and Dr. Peter Sims
Department of Economics, University of Warwick
Academic Years 2013-2014, 2014-2015

This course explains how the world economy got to be where it is today, focusing on the transformation to modern economic growth and the divergence between rich and poor nations. The long term changes in world income and population are explained and quantified. The key factors and theories that explain the success of rich countries and the obstacles that have hindered economic advance in lagging regions are identified and explored.
 

International Economic Institutions since
World War II

Professor Nick Crafts and Dr. Eric Golson
Department of Economic History, London School of Economics
Spring Term, 2012-2015
Graduate Level

The course analyses the evolution since World War II of the roles of international institutions designed to manage world trade and the international monetary system paying particular attention to the IMF, the World Bank, the GATT and WTO. The analysis of the post-war world is set against the background of the trade wars and breakdown of the Gold Standard in the inter-war period prior to the establishment of these institutions.
 

War and the Economy in the Twentieth Century

Dr. Eric Golson (module leader)
Department of Economics, University of Warwick
Autumn Term 2014

To familiarize students who have already acquired Honours-level competence in economic analysis with the economic background and experience of two World Wars and the Cold War, particularly in Europe and North America, and with some applications of economics that have been specific to defense and warfare in the twentieth century.
 

The International Economic System Since 1918

Dr. Bishnu Gupta with Dr.Eric Golson
Department of Economics, University of Warwick
Spring Term 2014

The module aims to introduce students to the problems and features of the international economy since the end of the First World War. Understanding the booms and the crises of the last century will help the students analyze contemporary events in a historical perspective. It will also contribute to an understanding of general patterns of growth and recessions and how policies can matter.
 

Internationalization of Economic Growth

Drs. Chris Minns and Tim Leunig with Eric Golson, et al
Department of Economic History, London School of Economics
School Year, 2011-2012

The course examines the inter-relationships between the development of the international economy and the growth of national economies since the late nineteenth century. The course is designed to introduce students not only to a wide variety of topics and issues, but also to the wide variety of approaches used by historians. The course includes analyses of the original leading nation, Britain, and its replacement, the United States, we well as the catch-up of areas such as continental Europe, and the failure to catch-up of earlier well-placed areas such as Latin America. The effects of major events - such as wars and debt crises - are investigated, and we also consider the implications of changing global economic institutions, such as the Gold Standard and IMF, as well as the effects of sometimes rapid changes in product and process technology.
 

The Evolution of Economic Policy in Advanced Economies

Dr. Roman Studer with Eric Golson, et al
Department of Economic History, London School of Economics
School Year, 2010-2011

This course examines major economic policy developments in advanced economies from World War I up to the present. Its organization will be chronological and it will deal with both major international as well as domestic policy issues.Topics covered will include the Gold Standard and its breakdown, causes of and responses to the Great Depression, the establishment and the performance of the Bretton Woods regime, the Marshall plan, free trade vs. protectionism, growth and development policies, the integration of global capital markets, migration and labour market regulations, social spending and redistribution, regional integration, the rise of global business and the role of the nation state in the global economy, new public management and the governance of the global economy.
 

The Integration of Europe's Economy, 1815-1990

Professor Max-Stephan Schulze with Eric Golson
Department of Economic History, London School of Economics
School Years, 2007-2008, 2008-2009 and 2009-2010

This course examines Europe's economic development and the process of economic integration and disintegration form the early nineteenth century to the present.
 


Management and Business History Courses

Business History

Dr. Eric Golson
Department of Economics, University of Surrey
Spring Term, 2016

Business is crucial to the supply-side of any modern economy, and receives considerable treatment in microeconomic theory. The relevance of this theory is often tested in formal statistical models, but history also provides a vehicle for understanding and using tools of economic analysis. The current module bases itself on this historical perspective, asking when various functions of modern business became important to economists and to economic performance, charting some significant subsequent developments, and emphasizing the role of technological change and innovation in shaping both organizational forms and the general business environment.
 

Sustainable Strategy

Chris Matthews and Dr. Eric Golson
Coventry University London MBA Programme
Academic Year 2015-2016
Graduate Level

This course explores the methods of analysis and evolution of business strategy in the modern corporation.
 

Business in the Global Environment

Professor Leslie Hannah and Sir Geoffrey Owen with Eric Golson, et al
Department of Management, London School of Economics
Academic Years 2011-2013
Graduate Level

The course looks at the process of globalisation at three levels: industries, firms and nations. The topics include: the changing structure of industries, using sectors such as automobiles and electronics to illustrate the new international division of labour; the response of companies, both those based in advanced industrial countries and those based in emerging markets, to increasing international competition; differences between countries in their institutional policies, focusing in particular on financial systems and corporate governance and on government industry and technology policies.
 

Historical Context of Business

Drs. Lars Boerner and Eric Golson
Department of Economic History, London School of Economics
Spring Term, 2013-2015
Graduate Level

This course explores the evolution and variation of the conditions under which business has operated in different parts of the world. It concentrates on but is not exclusively concerned with the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. In particular it is concerned with the environments in which industries have operated in different periods and places in history.
 

Foundations of Business

Dr. Eric Golson
Department of Business and Economics,
Richmond: The American University in London
Academic Years 2013-2017

The aim of the course is to introduce students to key concepts and terminology used in business. The core focuses on an introduction to the nature of business (e.g. the role of business, the main business resources…), the different types of sectors (primary, secondary, tertiary…) in the business world, and a brief introduction to the way markets work. Students will learn in this course to describe a business, and learn about the different functions within businesses. Each week, key terms will be introduced to students, which by the end of the course will be familiar with major business terms used in different business disciplines.
 

Managing the Multinational Corporation

Dr. Eric Golson
Department of Business and Economics,
Richmond: The American University in London
Academic Years 2013-2017

This is a final course for International Business students. It provides a managerial perspective into managing the structure and operations of multinational corporations (MNCs) in the global business environment. Major managerial issues are studied from the MNC’s perspective and the problems of planning and executing business strategies on a global scale are analysed. A project in International Business is required.
 

Foreign Trade Policy

Dr. Eric Golson
Department of Business and Economics,
Richmond: The American University in London
Academic Years 2013-2017

This Course familiarizes students with the most important practical and legal aspects of the foreign trading operation. Financing, insurance, documentation, goods handling, and transportation are discussed within the context of an export contract and also under counter trade arrangements. Field trips to commodity exchanges and a research project form a part of this course.
 

Business and Economic Performance since 1945: Britain in International Context

Dr. Tim Leunig and Eric Golson
Department of Economic History, London School of Economics
School Year, 2010-2011

This course looks at the history of British business and industry, with an emphasis on the post-war period. It examines some of the hypotheses on why the UK economy grew more slowly than other OECD nations with particular reference to the decades after the Second World War. Explanations of relative economic decline are examined in the context of comparisons with other European nations and with the US and Japan. The main attention is on recent decades, including current changes in performance, but the historical roots of Britain's poor performance are also considered. The focus is on business performance in the public and private sectors, including scale effects, multinationals' comparative performance, technology, labour management and management quality. Other factors alleged to have contributed to Britain's poor performance, ranging from 'culture' through government policy to education and trade unions, are also discussed.
 


Economics Courses

International Economics

Dr. Eric Golson
Department of Economics,
School of Oriental and African Studies (SOAS)
Academic Year 2015-2016

This course provides a critical overview of theoretical, empirical and policy issues relating to international economics. The first part of the course provides an introduction to the main theories of international trade, including standard neoclassical free trade approaches and recent theories addressing imperfect competition, economies of scale, national competitiveness issues, and managed trade. It also discusses topics in international trade such as the effects of trade on income distribution and poverty, the debate about import substitution and trade protection, and alternative approaches to trade policy. Part 2 covers topics in international macroeconomics and finance, including inter alia, the balance of payments, exchange rate policy, globalisation and international capital flows, financial crises and regionalism.
 

Economics of Developing Countries

Dr. Eric Golson
Department of Economics,
School of Oriental and African Studies (SOAS)
Academic Year 2015-2016

A wide range of issues are covered in this course, which focuses in the first term on different theoretical contributions to our understanding of growth and development in low income countries. The second term is devoted to considering major contemporary themes and topics relevant to low-income countries.
 

Foundations of Economics

Dr. Eric Golson
Department of Business & Economics,
Richmond: The American University in London
Academic Years 2013-2017

This course will introduce students to the foundations of microeconomic and macroeconomic theory and to aspects of international economics and development economics. Upon completion, students with an understanding of basic economic models and apply them to current economic issues and problems, both microeconomic and macroeconomic.
 

Research in Applied Economics

Dr. Eric Golson, et al
Department of Economics, University of Warwick
Autumn Term 2014

Supervised independent undergraduate research projects, to help students develop and acquire the skills of thinking independently as an economist and presenting ideas clearly.
 

Economics of Development

Dr. Eric Golson
Department of Business & Economics,
Richmond: The American University in London
Summer Semester 2010-2016 and Spring Semester 2011

The course will explore the problems of growth and development in developing countries. It seeks to explain the various theoretical models surrounding economic development, and the key issues which often act as obstacles in the path of development, e.g. poverty, inequality, inadequate human capital development. It will help students develop a framework to understand the current debates within the political economy sphere, such as globalisation, free trade, state intervention into markets, environment, fiscal policy and debt issues. Standard analytical tools, both microeconomic and macroeconomic, are used to analyse key economic problems.
 

History of Economics: How Theories Change

Dr. Huei-chun Su with Eric Golson, et al
Department of Economics, London School of Economics
School Year 2010-2011

This course examines the ways in which economics has developed from the Mercantilists of the 17th century to the Neoclassical thinking of the later 20th century. It will explore how the theories, concepts and methods of economics have changed over the last 250 years. We will use the original texts in order to understand how economists of the past approached perennial questions (about for example, the sources of growth or the role of money) and resolved them in the context of the scientific thinking and the economic conditions of their own time and place.
 


Finance Courses

Principles of Investment

Dr. Eric Golson
Department of Business & Economics,
Richmond: The American University in London
Fall Semester, 2011; Spring Semester, 2012; Summer, 2013

The course familiarizes the student with basic financial instruments and capital market operations, including new issuance, securities trading, and the role of different intermediaries in the investment market. Investment companies are subject to closer study. The fundamentals of portfolio theory are introduced and applied to investment management. Valuation of fixed-income securities, equity instruments, and common stock is discussed on the basis of modern capital market theory. The course introduces financial derivatives, including options, futures, forward rate agreements, and interest rate swaps, and relates the use of derivatives to fixed-income investment, portfolio analysis, and interest rate risk management.
 

Money and Banking

Dr. Eric Golson
Department of Business & Economics,
Richmond: The American University in London
Summer 2011

The principal objective is to enable students to understand the functions and operations of banking systems generally, with particular reference to the US system. The most significant recent developments are reviewed and commented upon. The main emphasis is on money and its place within the macro economy. The role of the commercial banks and the central bank is studied from the viewpoint of the part each plays in portfolio selection among economic agents. Some of the controversies about the effectiveness of fiscal and monetary policies are also reviewed. Students should appreciate the differences between different countries, and understand the role of the banking system in the economy as a whole.
 


LSE100: The LSE Course

The LSE Course

London School of Economics
January 2012-September 2013

LSE100 is an innovative new course that introduces first year undergraduates to the fundamental elements of thinking like a social scientist, by exploring some of the great intellectual debates of our time from the perspectives of different disciplines. Focusing on questions such as 'How should we manage climate change?', 'Does culture matter?' and 'Why are great events so difficult to predict?', LSE100 students explore the different approaches to evidence, explanation and theory that are used in the different social sciences.

I have responsibility for course development for the Financial Crisis module, delivered in the Michaelmas Term and the Poverty mini-Module in the Spring Term.